More reviews

More reviews are coming in for The Cantaloupe Thief, officially published June 27.

From Katrina Roets on Goodreads: What happens when your allergies wake you up in intense pain at 1:30am and it takes forever for pain medications to kick in? You pick up the closest book and you start reading…and in this case, you keep reading until the bendadryl has you nearly comatose and then the next day you pick the book right back up and finish it. That’s what happened with this book.

I am incredibly impressed that this is that author’s first mystery novel because the mystery is part of what kept me reading right up until the last page. I honestly had no idea who had done it. My favorite part of this book? The author uses her story to remind us all to take better care of the people around us and that nobody is invisible. We all have worth. It’s easy to forget what others are going through, but we need to be aware.

What else can I say about this book? It had just the right blend of mystery, tugging on the heart strings, social consciousness, and honest to goodness good old fashioned enjoyable reading. From what I’ve found out, this is only the author’s second book, but I certainly hope that it isn’t her last. It would be a downright shame not to make this a series!

From Publishers Weekly:   As Branigan investigates, the reader is given an up-close look into the lives of the town’s homeless population as they deal with alcoholism, drug addiction, and the other difficult circumstances that landed them on the streets. Richardson-Moore uses her experience as an investigative journalist and real-life work with the homeless to make a compelling story, and to breathe life into her complicated, multifaceted characters.

From UK blogger One Man in the Middle:  Any detective novel worth its salt gives you many characters to start with as a suspect list and whittles these down to people who have a means, motive and opportunity. The trick of the author in this case is to give you enough information and clues to suggest the route down a blind alley before bringing a big twist and suddenly everything falls into place. This is something that I think Deb has done brilliantly in this book with some clever characterisation.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s